Kids now spending more time online than watching television, survey shows

Children now spend more time on the internet than watching television, according to a survey of young Australians aged six to 13.

In 2016 kids spent an average of 12 hours a week online compared to 10.5 hours spent in front of the TV.

While television was still the number one entertainment of choice at home, internet use was expected to surpass TV in the next two years.

The results correlated with the increased use of mobile and tablet devices by children outside the home such as at school, on the bus, or when “out and about”.

About three-quarters of the children surveyed regularly used tablets, while 74 per cent of 12 to 13-year-olds surfed the web via a mobile phone.

Kids and their devices

  • 74 per cent of children aged six to 13 use a tablet.
  • 20 per cent of six to seven-year-olds use mobile phones; 2 per cent have their own phone.
  • 74 per cent of 12 and 13-year-olds use mobile phones.
  • Around 95 per cent of households with children have a computer.

via Kids now spending more time online than watching television, survey shows – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Man gets 20 years in “sextortion” case that involved Tucson girl, 13

A 39-year-old Utah man was sentenced to 20 years in prison Thursday in connection to two child pornography cases in federal court.

Donald Macarthur, of Lehi, Utah,  was sentenced in Tucson by U.S. Chief District Judge Raner C. Collins to the prison term, which will be followed by lifetime supervised release. Macarthur must register as a sex offender, according to a news release.

Macarthur had previously pleaded guilty to two counts of production of child pornography in two cases.

Authorities said Macarthur used the internet to meet young girls on modeling and pro-anorexia web sites. He communicated with the girls through email and text messages.

 

Our Digital Lifestyle Affects Connected Families

Today Intel Security released findings from a recent global study, “New Family Dynamics in a Connected World,” that aims to better comprehend how families’ attitudes and habits are evolving as their homes and lifestyles become increasingly connected. This study underscores the need for simple ways for parents to manage internet connectivity in their homes – from blocking inappropriate sites to controlling the amount of time users spend on their devices to disconnecting to the internet entirely from time to time.

via Intel Security Survey Reveals New Family Challenges as Connected Lifestyle Grows

How to protect your child against cyberbullying

Parents often feel overwhelmed with their child’s use of technology, and struggle to stay abreast of the latest apps and trends or to have some level of involvement in their child’s online activities.

While they want to keep their child safe, they’re not always sure what to do and often rely on their child’s school to provide guidelines.

Sameer Hinduja, Ph.D., a professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Florida Atlantic University, cautions that both educators and parents must to do their part.

via How to protect your child from cyberbullying | Knowridge Science Report

Ruined: When children themselves feel the full brunt of child pornography laws | National Post

By accident as much as design, Canada’s child pornography laws are blunt and broad. Applied to the letter, they criminalize common youthful sexual activity, and are dangerously ill-suited to the digital age, according to parents, lawyers, academics, even judges.
“We’re kind of in this bubble where people know there’s a problem,” says Andrea Slane, who researches sexting as associate professor of legal studies at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. But solutions are elusive.

via Ruined: When children themselves feel the full brunt of child pornography laws | National Post

Facebook policy chief Simon Milner blames parents for letting under 13s sign up | Daily Mail Online

‘We have a fundamental issue in the UK that there are many parents who choose for whatever reason to allow it,’ he told the communications committee of the House of Lords.

‘They know their children are on Facebook. Often they have helped their children get on to Facebook. That is very, very hard, when that happens, for us to know that person is not the age they say they are.’

Mr Milner said Facebook knew many under-13s were using its service but warned there was no easy solution. ‘When millions of parents are making that decision, how can we enforce it?’ he said.

via Facebook policy chief Simon Milner blames parents for letting under 13s sign up | Daily Mail Online

Top tips for parents on managing sexting

Sexting, as it’s called, is when people send suggestive photos of themselves by mobile phone, and it’s becoming more prevalent among young people. The danger is that an image shared privately may not stay that way for long – and the damage can last a lifetime.

Here is some advice for parents:
ADVICE TO HELP PREVENT YOUR CHILDREN SEXTING

via Top tips for parents on managing sexting | West Country – ITV News

South Yorkshire men targeted by sex blackmailers – The Star

More South Yorkshire young men are falling prey to ‘sextortion’ – being tricked into performing sex acts online and then blackmailed.

At least a dozen cases of the growing phenomenon have been recorded across the county this year, according to local police, who believe the figure is just the tip of the iceberg.

They are backing a national campaign to encourage more victims to come forward by assuring them they are not alone and need not fear judgement.

via South Yorkshire men targeted by sex blackmailers – The Star

Impact! How to Make a Difference (Cyberbullying) – Media Smarts and Telus

MediaSmarts has created the Impact! How to Make a Difference When You Witness Bullying Online program: a suite of resources for youth, parents, and teachers to support witnesses to cyberbullying. The program, which launched as part of Bullying Awareness Week (Nov. 13 – 19) was funded by TELUS.

The resources include:

·         A step-by-step, online interactive decision-making tool that helps students choose effective strategies for intervening in different cyberbullying situations;

·         A classroom lesson that supports the decision-making tool, with additional role-playing activities for students;

·         A parents’ guide, Helping Our Kids Navigate Cyberbullying, to help parents better support their kids if they’re targets of or witnesses to cyberbullying; and

·         A series of printable posters for the classroom that promote low-risk ways of intervening when students witness cyberbullying.

All of these resources build upon the findings from Young Canadians’ Experiences with Online Bullying, a 2015 study conducted by MediaSmarts and PREVNet and funded by TELUS. The research aimed to discover three things: what are the barriers to witness intervention in cyberbullying? What incentives can increase the likelihood of witness intervention? And which interventions are more or less likely to have a positive outcome? The findings informed the development of the Impact! program, which provides advice to youth, families, and educators for effective intervening in cyberbullying situations.

Explore Impact!

via MediaSmarts News for November 18, 2016