Media screens’ ‘detrimental effect’ on children’s sleep – BBC News

Research at Cardiff University found 72% of children have at least one portable media device in their sleep environment.
Such devices are said to impact on the duration and quality of sleep, which can lead to health problems.
Dr Ben Carter from the university’s School of Medicine said sleep was important for development.
He said their study was the first to consolidate results across existing research and provides “further proof of the detrimental effect” media devices can have on children’s sleep.

via Media screens’ ‘detrimental effect’ on children’s sleep – BBC News

How working together can help keep kids safe from digital dangers | National Post

Carol Todd remembers a time when teenagers’ insults were written on the bathroom wall or a piece of paper and could be washed away or torn to shreds.

It was a time when bullying was a schoolyard event, when the trials and tribulations of adolescence stopped at your bedroom door and that room was a refuge from the outside world.

No more. Now bullying has become a wider and more enduring problem through the use of technology and social media, says Todd.

“Something physical or face-to-face could happen at school and then they come home, turn on their devices and, boom, it’s right there — pictures, videos, words, the story. And it isn’t just one-to-one anymore. It’s one-to-100,000.”

via Sponsored Content: How working together can help keep kids safe from digital dangers | National Post

Screenagers Movie | Growing up in the digital age

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“SCREENAGERS probes into the vulnerable corners of family life, including the director’s own, and depicts messy struggles, over social media, video games, academics and internet addiction. Through surprising insights from authors and brain scientists solutions emerge on how we can empower kids to best navigate the digital world.”

via Screenagers Movie | Growing up in the digital age

Social Media Posts and the Law – Sue Scheff BlogSue Scheff Blog

For starters, it’s important to realize that court cases have accessed data from computers, smart phones, messages, videos, and more. The courts haven’t established a clear line of precedent in order to help law enforcement either.

But law enforcement has requested everything from photographs to medical records through the process of discovery. Discovery is when law enforcement tries to gather information related to a trial to help support their client. What you post on social media may, in fact, be relevant and requested if it’s related to a case.

via Social Media Posts and the Law – Sue Scheff BlogSue Scheff Blog

Young women with sexy social media photos seen as less competent

Girls and young women who post sexy or revealing photos on social media sites such as Facebook are viewed by their female peers as less physically and socially attractive and less competent to perform tasks, a new study from Oregon State University indicates.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-09-young-women-sexy-social-media.html#jCp

via Young women with sexy social media photos seen as less competent

Sexting pre-teens: Experts say Australian children are sending naked images via text

THE bar keeps getting lower and lower. Or, younger and younger.

Children as young as 10 are sending naked pictures of themselves to friends and classmates via text and social media, according to a leading child psychologist. …

… It was reported on Monday that school principals were turning to sexual assault groups for help with the fallout when young people sent and received messages containing nudity or sexual content.

The statistics suggest the problem is bigger than previously thought, and getting bigger all the time.

An Australian Institute of Criminology report from December showed a staggering jump in pre-teens’ use of mobile phones for sharing sexual pictures and videos.

via Sexting pre-teens: Experts say Australian children are sending naked images via text

Child Suicides More Often Linked to ADHD than Depression

New research suggests suicide among young children may have less to do with depression than previously thought. Researchers say child suicides are more frequently related to attention-deficit hyperactivity (ADHD).

The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, indicates young children who die by suicide before age 12 are nearly twice as likely to have an ADHD diagnosis than a depression diagnosis. This is the opposite of what is usually seen among adolescents ages 12-17 who die by suicide.

via Child Suicides More Often Linked to ADHD than Depression